How Our Rugs Are Made

Handmade​ rugs involve an age-old process that has been passed down through generations of draftsmen, weavers, and dyers, and each artisan is skilled in a specific task.

It’s a meticulous process that ensures the exceptional quality of our rugs and the reason it takes months, sometimes even up to a year, to complete one carpet. To this day, it’s awe-inspiring to see our experts at work.

Here’s a peek at how it happens.

Concepting The Design

Whether it’s a suzani or a abstract ​motif​, each rug starts with a hand-drawn design​. It’s the most conceptual aspect of the rug-making process but also the most important as it sets the course for what can and needs to be done. The design is then mapped out on to graph paper with the precise elements, motifs, proportions, and colors before it is translated to Taalim.

The design is then mapped out on to graph paper with the precise elements, motifs, proportions, and colors before it is translated to Taalim.

Originating from Iran, 'Taalim' is an age-old language that elucidates on the number of knots and its colors that weavers use to construct a rug.

Prepping The Yarn

Our rugs are crafted of either hand-spun or ​machine-spun​ wool and then dyed with either vegetable or chromium dyes.

The differences? Hand-spun, vegetable-dyed wool has a natural, organic look, whereas machine-spun, chromium-dyed wool is more uniform and fine.

Hand-spun Vegetable-dyed

Machine-spun Chromium-dyed

Weaving The Rug

For our hand-knotted rugs, our weavers use a specialized loom as they follow instructions from the Taalim, which is read aloud. There are many types of weaving styles that vary based on geographical locations. In our case, our hand-knotted rugs feature tight constructions that highlight the Pakistani as well as Afghan styles handed down through generations in the region.

For instance, a 8 x 10 rug involves three artisans: one who reads out the Taalim and two others who weave the carpet according to the instructions.

Finishing the Carpet

Washing

Once a rug comes off the loom, they go through a rigorous wash that rids it of the thick pile that has formed as well as layers of dust.

Drying

The rug is then left out to dry in sunlight before the pile is sheared to specification.

Trimming

The rug is then left out to dry in sunlight before the pile is sheared to specification.